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The city will build the El Corazon Lift Station at the former Garrison Elementary School property. Photo by Samantha Nelson
The city will place the El Corazon Lift Station at the former Garrison Elementary School property. Photo by Samantha Nelson
Cities News Oceanside Politics & Government Region

Oceanside to pay consultant $6.7M for wastewater facilities project

OCEANSIDE – The city is set to pay nearly $6.7 million for consulting services throughout the design and construction phases of a project to replace several wastewater pipelines and build a new sewer lift station.

The Oceanside City Council at its June 8 meeting approved an agreement with NV5, a technical engineering and consulting firm, to provide city staff with technical and control support throughout the project’s design phase, management and inspection services during the construction phase, and public outreach.

The project includes the construction of El Corazon Lift Station at the former Garrison Elementary School site, where the city is currently purchasing roughly three acres of land for the project from the Oceanside Unified School District.

The plans will also replace the Oceanside Mesa Garrison Force Main pipeline and Mission Avenue Lift Station Force Main.

Earlier in May, the council awarded a contract to Orion/TC Construction in a joint venture with GHD consulting as the design sub-consultant for the same project.

This particular project forwards the city’s long-term wastewater infrastructure goals, which include decommissioning the La Salina Wastewater Treatment Plant, expanding the San Luis Rey Water Reclamation Facility, and increasing recycled water production. The plan is to transfer the wastewater that would otherwise go to the La Salina treatment plant while also increasing local water supply, according to staff.

Construction of the Oceanside Boulevard Lift Station, another element of the overall project, has already started. Both the Buccaneer Lift Station and Force Main are already in the design phase.

The city expects to appropriate $94.2 million over the next five years for the project.

“There are plenty of funds remaining to fund the project,” said Senior Civil Engineer Mabel Uyeda.

Funding for the project mostly comes from the city’s Sewer Fixed Asset Replacement fund and an Environmental Protection Agency WIFIA (Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act) loan, which will finance up to 49% of the total project cost.

Staff expects to have a guaranteed price proposal for the project ready for construction services by December.

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