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Linda Luisi, a Carlsbad resident, is working to help the Oceanside Kitchen Collaborative gather donations from home gardens that have plants overproducing. Courtesy photo
Linda Luisi, a Carlsbad resident, is working to help the Oceanside Kitchen Collaborative gather donations from home gardens that have plants overproducing. Courtesy photo
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O’side Kitchen Collaborative wants garden overflow

CARLSBAD — Carlsbad resident, artist and home gardener, Linda Luisi, is one of many North County residents passionate about food and health and looking for ways to help.

And if your trees provide more fruit than you can eat, she suggests you drop it off at The Oceanside Kitchen Collaborative near Oceanside Boulevard.

Luisi’s veggies were picked up by Crystal from The OKC, which is another easy option offered by this nonprofit operation, with The Oceanside Green Kitchen’s zero waste policy. The OKC cooks and delivers thousands of meals daily. To contribute, to volunteer, or if you need food, call or visit theokc.org/.

“More people than ever are starting gardens, Luisi said. “We cannot tell from front yards, but many homes have extensive backyard veggie and fruit gardens. I chose butternut squash to donate because it’s hardy. It stays fresh for weeks, rather than rotting while waiting for processing. With people losing homes, jobs, and the ability to eat healthy food, let’s intentionally plant one extra veggie plant for them.”

“Did you know most pumpkin pies are made with squash? These butternuts have an edible thin skin, and are very dense, unlike huge hollow pumpkins. This makes them very efficient to grow and cook,” she added. “And they reproduce like bunnies! They are still multiplying in my yard. Fresh homegrown veggies make a big difference in the taste and nutritional quality of meals. Plant butternut squash in the spring. Hardy veggies, such as beets and broccoli, can be started in fall for winter harvest.”

The OKC asks that donors call first at (760) 707-8108.

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