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Mayor Catherine Blakespear gives her final State of the City address on Sept. 1 at Alila Marea Beach Resort in Encinitas. Photo by Jacqueline Covey
Mayor Catherine Blakespear gives her final State of the City address on Sept. 1 at Alila Marea Beach Resort in Encinitas. Photo by Scott Chatfield
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Blakespear gives final State of the City address

ENCINITAS — For the last time, Mayor Catherine Blakespear applauded the city’s achievements before area businesses and supporters. 

The Encinitas Chamber of Commerce hosted the State of the City address on Sept. 1 at the Alila Marea Beach Resort with a group of its most prominent sponsors, donors and city guests. The annual State of the City takes inventory of the last year and celebrates the city’s milestones. 

First, Pastor William Harman of the Grauer School led the large group with a sort of mantra in the meeting space of the five-star hotel, calling for peace within self, family, city, state and country. 

Blakespear and David DaCosta, chairman of the Encinitas Chamber of Commerce board of directors, celebrated the city’s accomplishments over the past year and its community-based organizations. 

First, DaCosta took the time to recognize the chamber for promoting and supporting small businesses in the city. DaCosta then looked to the events and fundraisers of Cardiff 101, Leucadia 101 and Encinitas 101, and called attention to the $1 million in proceeds toward Paul Ecke Elementary from the Leucadia farmers markets every weekend. 

Blakespear's daughter, Ava, listens during the State of the City vent on Sept. 1 at Alila Marea Beach Resort. Photo by Jacqueline Covey
Blakespear’s daughter, Ava, listens during the State of the City event on Sept. 1 at Alila Marea Beach Resort. Photo by Jacqueline Covey

“Thank you for all the support for our organizations,” DaCosta said.  

Giving her sixth State of the City message, themed “Poised and Ready,” Blakespear said many thank yous to local voices and honored her family’s 100-year history residing in Encinitas.  

“We are poised for the future and ready to lead in the city of Encinitas,” Blakespear said, adding that the city has the lead on the “bold challenges” before it. 

The city faces homelessness, fire, drought, housing, infrastructure issues and plenty of others, Blakespear said. Still, she believes in the city’s position as a “county-wide innovator” to create prosperity. 

The mayor also recognized recently completed portions of Streetscape and the El Portal under crossing, which were discussed during some of her first meetings as a councilor eight years ago.

“We have reconnected a community separated by a railroad track, and we recreated positive public space for gathering and for traveling where an overlooked and increasingly rundown highway used to be,” Blakespear said.  

Councilman Joe Mosca speaks with business owners at the State of the City event on Sept. 1 at Alila Marea Beach Resort. Photo by Jacqueline Covey
Councilman Joe Mosca speaks with business owners at the State of the City event on Sept. 1 at Alila Marea Beach Resort. Photo by Jacqueline Covey

The mayor also talked about mobility, the safe parking program and environmental achievements the city has seen in 2022. 

Then she turned to the “most difficult, ongoing conversation” in the city: housing. 

“Now, at this moment, finally, the city of Encinitas has a state-approved housing plan,” Blakespear said. “We have prudently resolved years of housing-related lawsuits and, what felt like, an ongoing regulatory purgatory with the state.”

The current housing element has resulted in 344 new affordable housing units — either built or in construction. 

However, Blakespear anticipates the city’s struggle with housing is not over, but she is hopeful projects, such as El Camino Real, alleviate growing pains. 

For future projects, Blakespear looked to the $7 million Pacific View project to rehabilitate the old elementary school into a public cultural arts space.  

The item has been put on a special meeting agenda on Tuesday, Sept. 6 at 5 p.m. 

1 comment

JohnEldon September 10, 2022 at 4:19 pm

And now … the rest of the story. Encinitas may have an officially state-approved housing element, but it will completely fail to deliver the number of affordable units the state mandates with its inflated RHNA numbers. Blakespear has consistently stood with Sacramento and big money developers and against the citizens of Encinitas, who favor local control over zoning and land use and who recognize that continuing population growth and densification pose the greatest threat to qualify of life in Encinitas. Blakespear and her city council puppets have refused to join other California cities in taking a stand against Sacramento, to prove in a court of law that Senate Bills 9 and 10 are unconstitutional. It is completely against our interests to replace Pat Bates, who has stood up for our established residential neighborhoods for eight years, with a stack-and-pack infill Toni Atkins / Scott Wiener clone.

This is why I am voting for Matt Gunderson for state senate. He and Blakespear are pro-choice on abortion, and both believe that we need to curtail our greenhouse gas emissions. The most important differences between them are that Gunderson is fiscally responsible (conservative in the best sense of the word), and he strongly believes in local control. Encinitas incorporated as a city specifically to overthrow county control over zoning and land use. California state government is now the enemy, and Gunderson recognizes this.

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